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May 2012 - Girl Scouts Blanket


PENDLETON TO WEAVE A LASTING MEMORY FOR GIRL SCOUTS' CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION



Portland, Oregon – May 21, 2012 — Pendleton Woolen Mills will weave a special blanket in the company's Pacific Northwest mill for the Girl Scouts' 100 year celebration. Each custom blanket will be issued with a commemorative label signed by Girl Scout alumna and former Governor of Oregon Barbara Roberts.

With the design initiated by Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington, the blanket is available for either pre-purchase or reservation on their storefront website at http://girlscoutsosw.org/shop.

At the top of the blanket are some of the original Girl Scout proficiency badges that represent history as well as the diversity of skills that girls have learned in the last century. From left to right: Artist (a girl was required to draw or paint in oils or water colors from nature); Health (was required to complete a list of tasks such as walk a mile a day for three months, eat no sweets for three months, etc); Pathfinder (was required to know the topography of her city, how to call in a fire alarm, and more); Swimmer (was required to swim fifty yards in clothing and boots, demonstrate artificial respiration, and more); Musical (was required to learn to play an instrument or have knowledge of singing among other skills); Naturalist (was required to make a collection of and correctly name sixty pieces of wild flowers, ferns and grasses).

At the center is the official 100th anniversary logo.

Stripes along the top and bottom represent the three parts of the Girl Scout Promise and the Courage, Confidence and Character element of the Girl Scout mission.

New proficiency badges line up on the bottom of the blanket representing the progression of grade levels the girls experience as they get older. From left to right: Girl Scout Daisy, Brownie, Junior, Cadet, Senior and Ambassador.

"We are extremely honored to have been chosen to weave this blanket to help celebrate and raise funds for the Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington," says Robert Christnacht, manager of Pendleton's Home Division and father to two former Girl Scouts.

The Pendleton designers who worked on this project have a strong connection with the organization. Kelly Fagan started as a Daisy, progressed to Senior and achieved the Gold Award, the highest possible honor. Janet Worthington, a member for 25 years who earned a 1st class award, relates, "Mom has been a Girl Scout for 58 years and as a girl earned a 1st Class Award, the highest level at that time. Dad was a Girl Scout for 45 years. My daughter has been a Girl Scout for 25 years and earned a Silver Award, the second highest."

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