{"dragByHandle":true,"cssSelector":"ql-thumbnail","dragByBody":false,"widgetClass":"OverlayWidget","bindings":{"bind0":{"element":".ql-thumbnail .Quicklook .trigger","type":"quicklookselected","fn":"function(){$.fnProxy(arguments,\'#headerOverlay\',OverlayWidget.show,\'OverlayWidget.show\');}"}},"effectOnHide":"","effectOnShowOptions":"{}","closeOnBackgroundClick":true,"effectOnHideOptions":"{}","effectOnShowSpeed":"","onScreenPadding":10,"allowOffScreenOverlay":false,"captureClicks":true,"effectOnShow":"","effectOnHideSpeed":""}

Print This Page

Untitled Document


Untitled Document
Pendleton National Parks

THE BIRTH OF OUR NATIONAL PARK SERVICE

The National Parks began in the American West, when awestruck visitors brought back tales of California’s towering redwoods, waterfalls, granite peaks, and pristine lakes. Montana and Wyoming had jagged mountain ranges, glaciers, and a mysterious valley of steam geysers. These wonders of the wilderness fired the American imagination.

President Lincoln signed the Yosemite Grant in 1864, protecting 750,000 acres of California wilderness. President Grant signed the Act of March 1,1872, preserving two million acres as Yellowstone National Park. Legally protected from commercial development, these areas had no provision for management.

On August 25, 1916, President Wilson signed legislation establishing the National Park Service, charged with managing and preserving 35 existing national parks and monuments for future generations. In the 100 years since its creation, the National Park Service has overseen growth to more than 400 areas covering 84 million acres. Millions of visitors from around the world visit these areas of beauty and history.

PENDLETON AND
THE PARKS

Montana’s Glacier National Park was established in 1910. James J. Hill, founder of the Great Northern Railroad, commissioned Pendleton Woolen Mills to create a one-of-a-kind blanket for the park’s lodges. The Glacier National Park blanket debuted in 1916, and has been in production ever since.

As the Park system has grown, so have Pendleton’s offerings. Blankets inspired by the colors and features of each park commemorate these unspoiled landscapes. Each blanket bears an intricately woven label, inspired by vintage souvenir window stickers given to visitors who motored to parks in their brand new automobiles, often with a Pendleton robe tucked over their knees.

Pendleton salutes the members of the National Park Service for one hundred years of work to preserve America’s Treasures. Our blankets have also been a part of the National Parks experience for most of a century. Just like the National Parks, Pendleton products are made to be passed from generation to generation, gathering memories along the way.

Pendleton Woolen Mills

JOIN US IN PRESERVING OUR NATIONAL PARKS

Through the National Parks Collection, Pendleton and our partners will contribute up to $500,000 through 2016 to the National Park Foundation in support of priority national park projects. Together we can help preserve and protect America’s greatest treasures for the next one hundred years.

Pendleton Woolen Mills, National Park Collection


PENDLETON NATIONAL PARK COLLECTION

Experience the history and romance of America’s National Parks. Since the early 1900s, Pendleton has honored these treasures with a collection of distinctive Park Blankets. We've since expanded the collection to include caps, beanies, socks, water bottles, candles, cuddly teddy bears, and many other items. Take or share a symbol of our National Parks, wherever adventure leads you.

Pendleton Woolen Mills



Pendleton Woolen Mills
Pendleton Woolen Mills

GLACIER

Label: A mountain goat looks down on the forest as glacial peaks rise in the background.
Blanket: On a background of white, stripes of black, yellow, scarlet and green represent Montana’s spring wildflowers blooming among the glaciers, lakes and rivers of Glacier National Park.




Pendleton Woolen Mills
Pendleton Woolen Mills

YELLOWSTONE

Label: An American bison roams the grasslands below Yellowstone’s Red Mountains. Blanket: Yellowstone Park has been a protected wilderness since Montana and Wyoming were still territories, thanks to geothermal wonders like the Grand Prismatic Spring that inspired this blanket’s vibrant hues.




Pendleton Woolen Mills
Pendleton Woolen Mills

GRAND CANYON

Label: The Colorado River flows along the Grand Canyon’s North Rim, as it has for 17 million years.
Blanket: The mile-deep geology of Arizona’s Grand Canyon unfolds in a warm ombre of burnt umber, ochre, rust and red against a deep blue background of sky and shadow.




Pendleton Woolen Mills
Pendleton Woolen Mills

BADLANDS

Label: Morning sun reflects on dramatic formations rising from the Dakota prairie floor.
Blanket: Striations of deeply eroded ancient rock formations in South Dakota’s Badlands inspire the natural colors of this blanket, against the green of prairie grasses that support bison and other wildlife.




Pendleton Woolen Mills
Pendleton Woolen Mills

CRATER LAKE

Label: Wizard Island rises from Crater Lake, the deepest lake in the Americas.
Blanket: Colors of an Oregon sunset form a striped border against the dark blue waters of Crater Lake, formed in the caldera of an extinct volcano.




Pendleton Woolen Mills
Pendleton Woolen Mills

RAINIER

Label: The historic Paradise Inn, built in 1916, welcomes guests to Mt. Rainier’s south slope.
Blanket: The bold red of Castilleja, commonly known as Indian Paintbrush, makes a background for stripes illustrating wildflowers, moss and other vegetation that grow in Washington’s rich soil.




Pendleton Woolen Mills
Pendleton Woolen Mills

YOSEMITE

Label: Half Dome, Yosemite’s most famous formation, rises in granite splendor above the valley floor.
Blanket: California’s clear blue sky sets the backdrop for a band of vivid colors in this pattern honoring America’s oldest national park, first set aside as a protected wilderness in 1864 by President Abraham Lincoln.




Pendleton Woolen Mills
Pendleton Woolen Mills

ROCKY MOUNTAIN

Label: Bighorn sheep bask in the sunny lowlands, reintroduced after near-extinction.
Blanket: Colorado’s Rocky Mountain ecosystem rises from lush grassland and forests to sub-alpine, alpine and barren alpine tundra in blue, green, gold and grey stripes.




Pendleton Woolen Mills
Pendleton Woolen Mills

ACADIA

Label: Bass Harbor Head Light catches dawn’s first rays on Mount Desert Island.
Blanket: The dark sky waits for sunrise above Maine’s seaboard, where Acadia’s Cadillac Mountain catches the first daylight in the continental United States each New Year’s Day.




Pendleton Woolen Mills
Pendleton Woolen Mills

GREAT SMOKY MOUNTAINS

Label: Mountains covered with brilliant fall foliage glow behind a historic stacked-wood cabin in Cades Cove.
Blanket: Greenery blankets the ancient, gentle ranges of the Great Smoky Mountains, along with “smoke,” water vapor generated by acres of hardwoods in Tennessee and North Carolina.






TELL US YOUR STORY!

We would love to make your stories part of the National Parks-100 celebration. Won’t you share?

Please include contact information. Thank you!